For more than a month now, since 17 November, France has seen an apparently unstoppable revolt from below. A massive tide of very visible protest has swept the country, initially against a rise in the tax on diesel, but rapidly becoming a revolt of the oppressed against 'the president of the rich', Emmanuel Macron.


After three weeks of increasingly angry mass protests, French President Emmanuel Macron suspended the massively contested tax on diesel. It remains to be seen whether this will defuse the mass movement calling for his government to resign.


Over the last weeks, France has witnessed widespread protest against neoliberal president Emmanuel Macron and his government. Close to 500,000 people blockaded roads and roundabouts on Saturday 17 November.


The legacy of the French revolution of 1848, the second time France overthrew a monarchy, played an important part in the escalation of the demonstrations and street fighting in Paris.

(Wikimedia commons)

A second labour law to facilitate redundancies and short term contracts, an end to railway workers’ protected status and the national public railway enterprise, selection for university entrance, huge cuts in several public services, social benefits cuts, a new tax on pensioners. It’s a flood of attacks on the working class, on pensioners...


Since the election of Emmanuel Macron, the president of the rich, and after the onslaught of the government against all sectors in society especially the public services - the railways (the SNCF), pensioners, young people, unemployed - we were expecting the day of action on 22 March to go well.


After another day of trade union protests across France, we carry an article on the growing mood of opposition to President Emmanuel Macron and his totally pro-business policies.
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